Feminist Awesomeness
Feminist ephemera

Prof. Julia Steinmetz
Feminist Awesomeness
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calumet412:

Evelyn “Jackie” Bross and Catherine Barscz at the Racine Ave police station, 1943, Chicago.
From the Chicago History Museum:
Evelyn “Jackie” Bross (left) and Catherine Barscz (right) at the Racine Avenue Police Station, Chicago, June 5, 1943
In 1943 Evelyn “Jackie” Bross of Cherokee heritage, was arrested on her way home from work for violating Chicago’s cross-dressing and public indecency ordinance. Bross, who was 19 at the time, and a machinist at a WWII defense plant, wore men’s clothes and sported a man’s hair cut – that was more than enough for the Chicago police. Chicago possessed an ordinance outlawing cross-dressing as early as 1851. 
For the bulk of the city’s history cross-dressing was a type of indecent exposure.  The ordinance decrees that “If any person shall appear in a public place…in a dress not belonging to his or her sex…. He or she shall be subject to a fine of not less than twenty dollars nor more than one hundred dollars for each offense”.
When Bross appeared in court, Chicago was captivated by the story. In court, Bross reportedly informed the judge that she chose to wear men’s clothing because it was “more comfortable than women’s clothes and handy for work.” She openly declared, “I wish I was a boy. I never did anything wrong. I just like to wear men’s clothes… [but] everyone knows I’m a woman.”
In the end, Bross was ordered to see a court psychiatrist for six months and Chicago’s cross-dressing code was revised. As of 1943, the code allowed for individuals to wear clothing of the opposite sex, provided it was not worn “with the intent to conceal his or her sex.” Arrests continued in spite of the alteration and the Chicago code regarding cross-dressing would not be eliminated until 1978.
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vintagegal:

Harlem, New York City 1940. Photo by Martine Barrat
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vintageblackglamour:

Josephine Baker in Paris, 1940. This picture was taken around the time she joined the French Counterespionage Services and became a counterespionage agent. She was awarded the Croix de Guerre and the Medal of Resistance with Rosette by the French government for her efforts during World War II. Photo: Studio Harcourt, Ministry of Culture (France).
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sodashopsweetie:

1943
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lostsplendor:

"A pilot of the U.S. Women’s Air Force Service at Avenger Field, Texas, in 1943" by Peter Stackpole (via LIFE)
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coolchicksfromhistory:


Western Airlines stewardesses picket company ticket counter at L.A. Airport to protest recent firing of a stewardess who was four pounds overweight. From left they are Lorraine Storto (back to camera), Glenrae Jenks, Helen Barrios, Carol Zemke and Lila Lynn.
1974

Weight limits for American flight attendants ended in 1990.
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eternallybeautifullyblack:

Black feminists picked up freeing Angela Davis as an issue, but this would not have been addressed by the larger women’s movement.  [source]
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eternallybeautifullyblack:

Black feminists picked up freeing Angela Davis as an issue, but this would not have been addressed by the larger women’s movement.  [source]
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Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)

Some American Feminists (1980)
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"The Constitution they wrote was designed to protect the rights of white, male citizens. As there were no black Founding Fathers, there were no founding mothers — a great pity, on both counts. It is not too late to complete the work they left undone. Today, here, we should start to do so."

Shirley Chisholm 

"For the Equal Rights Amendment" 

August 10, 1970

(via coolchicksfromhistory)
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mylistofthangs:

Not saints, nor whores, only women.
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womensliberationfront:

"The most blatant obstacle to female friendship is the prevailing patriarchal adage that "women are each other’s worst enemies." This theme has many variations, and a chorus of male voices through the centuries has echoed Jonathan Swift’s words: “I never knew a tolerable woman to be fond of her own sex.” It would be easy to dismiss this chorus by virtue of its sex or to emphasize the unintended clue given in Swift’s remark that the women whom men find “tolerable” are not fond of their own sex. So women disidentify with other women in order to make themselves “tolerable” to men.”http://www.feminist-reprise.org/docs/raymond2.htmAt WoLF, we believe lifelong political and personal solidarity with other women is required to sustain a serious women’s liberation resistance movement.Learn more about our principles here:http://womensliberationfront.org/document-statement-of-principles/Image credit: George Fiske, 1895
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bunfoot:

owls-parliament:

oh my god 

her name is rin nakai and look at her fight history